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Protecting what matters

Those dearest to us, and those financially dependent upon us

If something should happen to you, the last thing you want is for you or your family to be worrying about money. One of the most important aspects of your financial planning should be to ensure that you’ve made provision for your family and any dependants in the event of a serious illness, injury or untimely death.

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Sandwich generation

Financially squeezed between elderly parents and children

Faced with the task of caring for elderly parents alongside your children, being in the Sandwich Generation can be a testing time. Finding yourself squeezed between – and often by – these two generations can be very stressful.

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Work pressures

The greatest strains on physical and mental health

There is an increasing trend for people to work for longer and delay their retirement, with some staying in work out of financial necessity. But one of the primary concerns people have about working beyond their 50s is the impact this could have on their health, or whether any health concerns might prevent them from working.

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Financial Protection

Families left in a precarious situation if the unforeseen were to happen

We all put into place plans for our future, but making sure that you and your family can cope if you fall ill or die prematurely is something we can too easily put to one side.

In particular, a recent study identified financial protection as something which millions of fathers in the UK, and their families, could benefit from.

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When I'm gone

How a simple list can help your loved ones after your death

Although it may not feel like it, your family finances are probably more precarious than you think. It’s all well and good when the breadwinners are healthy and working, but if something unfortunate were to happen, the outlook for those around you could change instantly.

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Growing Care Costs

As part of budget 2017, chancellor Philip Hammond announced an extra £2 billion of funding for social care and paved the way for major changes to how people pay for it.

But people in the UK are still underestimating the cost of elderly care by £7 billion every year[1], according to new research from Scottish Widows’ independent think tank, The Centre for the Modern Family.

On average, UK adults estimate that residential care would cost £549 a week – when, in reality, it costs on average £866 for a place in a nursing home – leaving a shortfall of £317 every week[2].